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Tulsi Gabbard walks through the spin room after the first night of the Democratic presidential debates on June 26, 2019, in Miami. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Tulsi Gabbard walks through the spin room after the first night of the Democratic presidential debates on June 26, 2019, in Miami. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Score

Tulsi Gabbard was the most searched candidate on Google after Democratic debate

By WITW Staff on June 27, 2019

Hawaii Representative Tulsi Gabbard prevailed at the Democratic debate in Miami on Wednesday night by one measure: She scored the most Google searches after the debate, USA Today reports.

Before the debate, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren was the most searched candidate, followed by New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, former Texas Representative Beto O’Rourke, and then Gabbard, USA Today reports, citing data from Google Trends. After the debate, Gabbard zoomed up to first place, while Booker remained in the second spot and Warren moved down to third.

Gabbard is an Army National Guard veteran who was deployed twice to the Middle East, The New York Times reports. Her views on foreign policy have become key themes in her campaign. She has focused on ending what she calls “regime change wars” and the nuclear arms race, according to the Times. She has spoken out against President Trump’s Iran strategy and North Korean policy and a climate of warmongering.

She says she is the only candidate talking about nuclear war as an existential threat, according to the Times.

Earlier this year, she apologized amid a controversy over her past work for an anti-gay advocacy group. The group, the Alliance for Traditional Marriage, was run by her father, State Senator Mike Gabbard, the Times reports. The group opposed gay rights in Hawaii and helped pass an amendment to the state constitution that gave the legislature the power to ban same-sex marriage, according to the Times.

“In my past I said and believed things that were wrong, and worse, they were very hurtful to people in the LGBTQ community and to their loved ones,” Gabbard said in a video posted to YouTube and Twitter. “My views have changed significantly.”

During the debate on Wednesday night — the first of two nights of debates — Booker was the most searched, while Gabbard was second, O’Rourke was third, and Warren was fifth. Health care and immigration were the top two searched issues during the debate.

To be sure, trending on Google doesn’t necessarily mean people are searching for names for positive reasons, USA Today points out. But in a field of 24 candidates, standing out from the crowd is a major goal.

Read the full story at USA Today.

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