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Michelle Williams attends the New York Premiere for FX's 'Fosse/Verdon' on April 08, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Nicholas Hunt/WireImage)

‘Gwen went light’

Dancer Gwen Verdon’s under-appreciated work for Broadway director Bob Fosse gets spotlight

April 10, 2019

Fosse/Verdon, a new FX miniseries on the life and work of famous Broadway director Bob Fosse and dancer Gwen Verdon, is being billed as a post #MeToo examination of the myth of “the auteur, usually male, who is doing everything himself.”

Originally intended as an adaptation of Sam Wasson’s 2013 biography Fosse, the film’s concept was revised after producers decided that the story would be incomplete if it ignored the vital ways Verdon, Fosse’s wife, contributed to his success.

“The series, as it goes on, is really about the unsung role that Gwen, Bob’s wife and collaborator, played in forming his work,” producer Steven Levenson told the Hollywood Reporter. “It’s about how things actually get made.”

The series also examines the stark differences in how Fosse, an infamous womanizer, and Verdon capitalized on their individual and collaborative successes.

“We felt that in telling this story now, we have an added responsibility to really talk about abuse of power,” said Levenson. “Bob used his power for good and bad, and we want to be honest about the way that he interacted with young women especially, and the pressure that those women were under to go along to get along.”

Actress Michelle Williams, who will play the role of Verdon alongside Sam Rockwell as Fosse, said that a key aspect of their respective characters was the alleged emotional and sexual abuse they both endured as children.

“Sam and I would talk about them as twins,” she recalled. “They come from this very similar place, these abusive backgrounds, and it manifests inside of them in different ways. Bob went dark, and Gwen went light. Gwen wanted to rise above everything, she refused to feel pain, whereas Bob wanted to delve into it.”

Read the full story at the Hollywood Reporter.

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