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Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden listens during Class Day Exercises at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., May 24, 2017.   (REUTERS/Brian Snyder)
Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden listens during Class Day Exercises at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., May 24, 2017. (REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

'It's disqualifying'

Biden says he ‘may not recall’ alleged misconduct, but men must take claims seriously

By WITW Staff on March 31, 2019

Former Vice President Joe Biden responded on Sunday to an allegation made by a former Nevada assemblywoman that he touched and kissed her without her consent. Lucy Flores claimed late last week that Biden had acted inappropriately during one of her campaign rallies when she was running for lieutenant governor in 2014. But Biden said that not once during “countless handshakes, hugs, expressions of affection, support and comfort” as a politician did he believe he had ever acted inappropriately.

“I may not recall these moments the same way, and I may be surprised at what I hear,” Biden said in a statement. “But we have arrived at an important time when women feel they can and should relate their experiences, and men should pay attention. And I will.”

The accusation, which Flores made in an essay published in The Cut on Friday, could complicate Biden’s expected bid to become the Democratic nominee for president. Immediately after the essay was published, a Biden spokesperson asserted that Biden didn’t have “an inkling that Ms. Flores had been at any time uncomfortable.”

After his more carefully considered statement was issued on Sunday, Flores said she was glad that he is “willing to listen” — but she won’t be voting for him anytime soon.

“For me, it’s disqualifying,” she told CNN. “I think it’s up to everybody else to make that decision.”

Read more at the Washington Post.

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