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French President Emmanuel Macron (C/R) joins 2018 Nobel Peace Prize laureates Dr. Denis Mukwege (TOP/L) and Nadia Murad (FRONT/2L), and actress Emma Watson (C), following a meeting for Gender Equality at The Elysee Palace in Paris on February 19, 2019. (YOAN VALAT/AFP/Getty Images)

At the table

Nobel laureate Nadia Murad, U.N. goodwill ambassador Emma Watson to advise G7 on women’s rights

By WITW Staff on February 20, 2019

A group of human rights advocates has met in Paris to advise members of the G7 on strategies to reduce violence and discrimination against women.

When France assumed presidency of the G7 in the new year, French President Emmanuel Macron named 35 advocates to share their recommendations for achieving gender equality, focusing across three major topics: combating violence against women; promoting girls’ education, and women’s entrepreneurship. The G7 — short for ‘Group of Seven’ — consists of the world’s leading industrialized nations, including Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the U.K, and the U.S.

Among the 35 specialists who make up the G7 Advisory Committee For Equality Between Women and Men are three Nobel Peace Prize winners; Congolese gynecologist Denis Mukwege and Yazidi activist Nadia Murad, as well as Tunisian businesswoman Wided Bouchamaoui. Actress Emma Watson, a United Nations goodwill ambassador on gender equality issues, is also a part of the group.

A chair was left empty at the meeting for human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh, who is imprisoned in Iran.

Macron said France was financing a 120-million euro ($136 million) fund to help women’s rights movements across the world, especially in developing countries.

In 2016, Nadia Murad came into the Women in the World offices and bravely shared her experiences at the hands of ISIS. Watch below:

Read the full story at Boston25 News.

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