‘Boiling point’

Protesters in South Korea rage against epidemic of hidden-camera pornography

More than 40,000 women took to the streets of Seoul on Saturday, to vent their rage at the pervasiveness of spy camera pornography in the tech-savvy nation.

The “molka” or hidden camera videos are created by secretly filming women in schools and offices, restrooms, change rooms and on public transport — a crime so rife it is reported on daily in the South Korean media. More than 5,000 spy camera crimes were reported to police last year.

“The pent-up anger among women has finally reached a boiling point”, one of the event organizers, who identified herself simply as Ellin, told AFP.

“Entering a public bathroom is such an unnerving experience these days,” said 21-year-old Claire Lee, adding that she always inspected the walls for “suspicious holes.”

In July, a 43-year-old man was arrested for secretly filming occupants of Seoul motel rooms for four years, having planted tiny lenses inside TV speakers and other electronic devices while posing as a guest. Police found more than 20,000 secretly filmed videos at his home.

In other cases, spy cameras have reportedly been installed inside eyewear, lighters, watches, car keys and neckties.

Women have been gathering to protest monthly since May, drawing attention to — and venting their anger at — the alarmingly accelerating phenomenon. Protesters on Saturday carried signs reading “My life is not your porn” and “Angry women will change the world.”

For more on the story, watch the video below.

Read the full story at The Telegraph.

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