Double take

Identical twin sisters both run for office — on squarely different sides of the political aisle

A pair of identical twin sisters who survived an upbringing in an abusive foster home are running for local office in Michigan — one as a Democrat, and the other as a Republican. Monica Sparks and Jessica Ann Tyson live in neighboring electoral districts, where they are both campaigning for a seat on the governing board of Kent County, the state’s most populous area after Detroit. And while the two sisters have stark ideological differences — Tyson endorsed Sparks’ Republican opponent in the race for her district — they both agree that their love for each other will remain unchanged regardless of where their political paths take them.

In a joint interview with AFP, the sisters said that they had been abused “emotionally, physically, sexually” in the foster home they were put into at age 5, before eventually being adopted into a loving family that raised them to believe in giving back to their communities.

The two differ sharply in their opinions on the competency and character of President Donald Trump. “I just don’t like what’s happening in our country right now. And I can’t stand by. I’ve got to do something,” Sparks told the AFP.

Tyson, though, is a fervent backer of the president. “I totally believe in our president,” she said, pointing out, though, that she is able to understand the concerns Trump detractors, like her identical twin, have about him.

But sisterhood remains above politics. They hope the example they set will help other families that have found themselves divided by the former reality TV star’s polarizing presidency.

“It just baffles our mind why people hate each other,” Tyson told AFP. “Mothers aren’t talking to sons. Fathers are disowning daughters.”

“We are not going to let this come between our family,” added Sparks.

“If we’re going to get ahead as a society, like right now, it’s almost down to I don’t care what your political affiliation is. We’ve got problems. Shots fired. There’s a lot of stuff happening there and we need to figure out a way to work across the lines no matter what,” Sparks continued. “People are hurt. People are bitter, because they are feeling disenfranchised. You start by getting in the same room … and come prepared with open ears, an open mind and open heart. Then we will be able to find solutions.”

Watch the sisters’ interview with AFP below.

Read the full story at NDTV.

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