No Moore

Black women played a crucial role in Doug Jones’ victory over Roy Moore in Alabama

Senator-elect Doug Jones taking a group picture with Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) (R) and Rep.Terri Sewell (D-AL) (3rd from Right) and supporters during a campaign event held at Alabama State University. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

A surge of votes from black women helped Democrat Doug Jones secure a remarkable victory in Alabama’s special Senate election on Tuesday, even as the vast majority of white Alabamians voted for Republican Roy Moore. Jones, a former U.S. attorney, edged Moore, the controversial judge, by a razor-thin margin: 49.9 percent to 48.4 percent, according to The New York Times. Exit polls showed what factors may have tipped the result to Jones’ favor. Black voters ended up accounting for 29 percent of Tuesday’s electorate — a jump from the state’s average in elections since 2008, where black voters have typically only accounted for 25 percent of the electorate. Of those black voters, nearly 59 percent were women — and 98 percent of black women voted for Jones. In a narrow race that had once seemed near impossible for Moore to lose, those votes likely made a critical difference.

Moore’s chances at winning the Senate seat in Alabama, a deeply Republican state that is also known for voter suppression laws that disproportionately target black and Latino voters, were ultimately harmed irreparably by allegations that he sexually harassed or assaulted at least nine women — including five women he allegedly molested while he was in his thirties and they were teenagers. The Republican National Committee initially pulled its support of the embattled candidate before abruptly re-endorsing him after President Donald Trump, who himself has been accused by at least 19 women of sexual harassment and assault, began speaking out on Moore’s behalf. According to exit polls, 63 percent of white women, and 68 percent of white people overall, still decided to vote for Moore.

Read the full story at The Huffington Post.

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