‘Not lining up for it’

“Female Viagra” drug Addyi fails to find consumers after FDA approval, $1 billion sale

(Addyi)

Headlines heralded the arrival of a “female Viagra” last summer shortly after Sprout Pharmaceuticals received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell flibanserin, which the company branded Addyi and said would help boost women’s sex drive. But six months later, the drug had only been prescribed fewer than 4,000 times. Sprout was gobbled up by the bigger pharmaceutical firm Valeant for $1 billion shortly after the approval, but Valeant soon faced internal problems as well as public and Congressional scrutiny for raising the prices of older drugs. A host of restrictions on marketing and prescribing Addyi, including a “black box” warning against drinking alcohol and an 18-month ban on advertising, resulted in a limp launch for the big-name drug. The drug’s effectiveness has also been widely questioned.

“I see a lot of patients,” Dr. Lauren F. Streicher, a Chicago area gynecologist, told The New York Times, “and at the end of the day, it’s not like they’re lining up for it.”

Valeant plans to relaunch the drug this year with more supportive marketing. The drug costs $800 for one prescription.

Read the full story at The New York Times.

Related:

‘Female Viagra’ not a hit with consumers in first months on the market

CEO of company behind Addyi says female sexuality is about biology, not just psychology

“Female Viagra” caused dissent at FDA, memo shows

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *