A new day

3 easy ways to celebrate extraordinary women in science

Alice Catherine Evans, a microbiologist whose discovery in 1918 about bovine milk led to the practice of pasteurization

Thursday is a momentous occasion. It’s the very first observance of International Day of Women and Girls in Science. As a result many news organizations around the world are taking a look at some of the contributions women have made throughout history and more recently.

Here are a few highlights:

– Australia’s ABC News has a briefing on five women scientists making great strides in their fields, including Janet Lanyon, a marine biologist who has devoted 30 years of her career to studying dugongs, also know as “the ladies of the sea.”

– The Daily Beast has an opinion piece co-authored by Kimberly Arcand and Megan Watzke, both longtime NASA scientists who worked on the space agency’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. The two women call for an end to the pervasive sexism that plagues the “science’s boys club.”

– Finally, CNN has an illuminating slideshow commemorating 21 women in science who blazed the trail for women entering STEM fields today. CNN focuses on women who made an impact in the field of medicine and saved millions of lives. Florence Nightingale, Marie Curie and Alice Catherine Evans, a microbiologist whose discovery in 1918 about bovine milk led to the practice of pasteurization, are just some of the luminaries on the list. Click through to see some of the more recent women who’ve made contributions in STEM.

Related:

What if male scientists were described the same way as female scientists?

Women doctors fire back at newspaper columnist who claims they are the problem with the medical field

Female scientists respond to sexist comments with #distractinglysexy Twitter campaign

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *