Relentless Award

Philip Seymour Hoffman’s legacy fosters two new plays by women, about women

(GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)

After Philip Seymour Hoffman’s untimely death in February 2014 at the age of 46, from “acute mixed drug intoxication,” a prize was created in his honor by friend David Bar Katz. At $45,000, the Relentless Award is the largest annual cash prize in American Theater awarded to a playwright in recognition of a new play.

The prize is funded by magazine The National Enquirer and its publisher, American Media Inc, who settled a libel case after falsely reporting that Hoffman had a gay affair with Katz (himself a playwright).

Co-recipient of the inaugural Relentless Award, playwright Clare Barron. (Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Co-recipient of the inaugural Relentless Award, playwright Clare Barron. (Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

The first award was announced last month, to be shared between two female playwrights — Clare Barron and Sarah DeLappe — each of whom chose to focus on the relationships between young women who are competing in physical endeavors. DeLappe’s play, The Wolves, features a girls soccer team, while Barron’s script Dance Nation is about teenage dancers.

“We had so many discussions over the years of how tough it is on playwrights, and how difficult to survive,” Mr. Katz told The New York Times.

Read the full story at Adweek.

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