Little Pink Pill

‘Female Viagra’ not a hit with consumers in first months on the market

(photo via addyi.com)

When Viagra first debuted in the American market in 1998, more than 36,000 men received prescriptions for the libido-boosting wonder drug in the first week. But this year, as the first female sex drug debuted after a years-long fight for approval in the FDA, only 1,841 women have filled prescriptions for the drug in its first 10 weeks on the market. There are plentiful reasons consumers may be wary of the drug: The pill must be taken daily, as opposed to Viagra which can be taken only at the time of intercourse, and cost $26 per pill. Flibanserin is shown to improve libido only moderately better than a placebo, and women can’t drink while taking it. And while it reportedly treats the medical condition known as Female Sexual Dysfunction, few scientists agree on what causes or constitutes FSD.

“The framing of female sexual problems as brain disorders and as medical crises that need medical solutions is a misunderstanding of sexuality that can have great power over and above this particular drug,” Leonore Tiefer, a New York University psychiatrist and sex therapist who opposed the approval, told the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Read the full story at the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Related:
Alternatives to ‘female Viagra’ may boost women’s sex lives
CEO of company behind Addyi says female sexuality is about biology, not just psychology
“Female Viagra” caused dissent at FDA, memo shows

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